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Avoiding Persuasion Pitfalls (Part 1)

"Linguistics is arguably the most hotly contested property in the academic realm. It is soaked with the blood of poets, theologians, philosophers, philologists, psychologists, biologists, anthropologists, and neurologists, along with whatever blood can be got out of grammarians." - Russ Rymer Who knew linguistics was such a hotbed of activity? I have an image of professors in tweed giving their intellectual enemies fierce tongue lashings. What is it about language that incites so much arguing? Language, despite it's beauty and potential, also divides and separates. Keeping in mind the thought, 'The pen is mightier than the sword', I'd like to examine the eight most counterproductive words as applied to persuasion. These words diminish persuasion not only in daily interactions, but in your interactions with your affluent prospects and clients.

Most specifically in groups of elite individuals do we need to be congruent in our actions and words. For each of these words, there is an exception to the rule and as you learn the reasons why these words don't work well in many situations, feel free to explore how the exceptions to the rules work to your advantage. However, if you're a beginning persuader, these words should be avoided at all cost. When we first begin to understand the importance of rapport, it can be a tricky thing to keep hold of. Persuasion is weak at first and then as you learn to navigate your way through it, it becomes quite magnetic.

When working with an affluent prospect or client, what your magnetic persuasion skills are really telling them are: 'I am like you'. The eight most dangerous words in persuasion kill the rapport that you have established, they stop it from growing and cast doubt. BUT. 'But' cancels out everything that was said before it. "I'd really love to buy your product, but." Hmm. that doesn't sound like a sale, does it? "I think you're really fun to be around, but." But, I don't want to be around you anymore. As you can see 'but' cancels out absolutely everything before it. It's all gone. TRY. Trying always presupposes failing. Either you're going to do it, or you're not going to do it. There is no such thing as 'try'. Try is an excellent word to use on an advanced level, and until you're there, don't use it. IF.

'If' is a weak word similar to 'try'. It presupposes that you "might not" do as you say. "If you want to sign up for our service." Is that confidence? Is that reassuring to hear? Nope. 'If' isn't supportive. It is weak and lacks intention. It gives people a way out. 'If' gives you a way out. MIGHT. Another of our wishy-washy weak words is 'might'.

"I might be able to help you." Well, can you help me or not? 'Might' takes away your personal power. If you speak authoritatively, you will be respected by the affluent and rewarded with their business. Coming Soon: Part 2.


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